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Flight Instruction

The First 5 Stages of a Pilot's Carrier:

Student Pilot - Private Pilot - Commercial Pilot - Instrument Rating - Airline Transport Pilot

A) Student Rotorcraft Pilot: Course Part 61 available

     This is your first step. You will build the foundation and base of your Piloting carrier. More? see SFAR 61.81 to 61.95

How do you get a student Certificate?

You get your student certificate after your first FAA medical examination in fact your medical is your certificate.

After instruction, fulfill all requirement & endorsement: you will do your first solo flight, and cross-country solo.
The number of your Student pilot license (Medical certificate) gives you access to diverse weather reports and forecasts (online or telephone FSS), to prepare and plan your flight.

 

The limitation of a Student Pilot


Cannot carry passengers
Cannot carry property or any business for compensation or hire
Other limitation, see S.FAR 61.89
Eligibility for Student Pilot
Be at least 16 years of age.
Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language.


I recommend A.S.A.P. apply for an FAA medical certificate (the earlier the better).

4 more step to go, Private Pilot - Commercial Pilot - Instrument Rating - Airline Transport Pilot

B) The Private Rotorcraft Pilot Program: Course Part 61 Available

For people who may be learning to fly as a hobby, for personal business or planning to purchase their own aircraft.

 

The privilege of a Private Pilot


- With your Private Pilot License you are allowed to take family, friends and co-workers on board your aircraft or a rented aircraft while acting as Pilot in Command.
- You can also fly with family, friends and accountancy and share at pro-rata the operational expense of the aircraft.
- Fly and generate revenue for charitable organization. (See restriction S-FAR 61.113)
- The limitation of a Private Rotorcraft Pilot

 

The limitation of a a Private Pilot

 The only restriction to acting as a Private Pilot is that the FAA does not allow you to be compensated for your skills.

How do you get a Private Rotorcraft Pilot?
- Be at least 17 years of age.
- Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language.
- Receive logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor to take the tests.
- Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this section that apply to the aircraft - category and class rating sought.
- Pass the written test.
- Pass the practical test.


The Minimum requirements to obtain a Private Pilot’s License
- 35 hours minimum of flight time, which must include 20 hours of flight instruction.
- 3 hours of Cross Country training
- Night training includes one cross country flight over 50 nautical miles and 10 takeoffs and landings at night.
-  5* hours of solo flight time *(Part 141 Only)
- 3 hours training in preparation for the flight-test with a qualified instructor within 60 days prior.
- Take a physical from a FAA-certified examiner receiving a 1st Class, 2nd Class or 3rd Class Medical certificate. To receive your Private Pilot License, you are required to have at least a 3rd Class Medical.


To view the medical or certification requirements in greater detail, please contact the Federal Aviation Administration at 954 356 7520 or contact me @ 954 394 4229

Pass an oral and flight test given by the FAA or an approved designated pilot examiner.

 

3 more step to go, Commercial Pilot - Instrument Rating - Airline Transport Pilot

C) Commercial Rotorcraft Pilot: Course part 61 available

 

The privilege of a Commercial Pilot certificate.

A person who holds a Commercial Pilot certificate may act as Pilot in Command of an aircraft and carry persons or property for compensation or hire, provided the person is qualified for the operation, example (photo flight, Patrol, Electric or Pipeline maintenance, surveillance, construction survey and other...)

The limitation of a Commercial Rotorcraft Pilot

 Do not overstep on other certificate requirements (for example, SFAR parts 133 (Air Lift), SFAR parts 135 (Air Carrier, Air Taxi), SFAR parts 137 (Agricultural ...))

How do you get a Private Rotorcraft Pilot?

- Be at least 18 years of age.
- Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language.
- Hold at least a private pilot certificate.
- Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of the applicable FAA requirement that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.
- Pass the knowledge test.


I recommend to pass instrument rating because you are required to have 10 hours of instrument training anyway.

For a Rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating you must log at least 150 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least:
- 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in helicopters.
- 100 hours of Pilot-In-Command flight time, which includes at least:
-35 hours in helicopters; and
- 10 hours in cross-country flight in helicopters.
- 20 hours of training on the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.127(b)(3) of this part that includes at least:
- 10 hours of instrument training in an aircraft;
- One cross-country flight of at least 2 hours in a helicopter in day VFR conditions, consisting of a total straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure;
- One cross-country flight of at least 2 hours in a helicopter in night VFR conditions, consisting of a total straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure;

- 3 hours in a helicopter in preparation for the practical test within the 60-day period preceding the date of the test.
- 10 hours of solo flight in a helicopter on the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.127(b)(3) of this part, which includes at least:
- One cross-country flight with landings at a minimum of three points, with one segment consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure;
- 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern).

Pass an oral and flight test given by the FAA or an approved designated pilot examiner.

 

2 more step to go, Instrument Rating - Airline Transport Pilot


D) Helicopter Instrument Rating (IFR): Course part 61 available


The instrument rating is the best way to build hours, every hour will be used for your commercial rating .
The best investment and an asset for your helicopter career. Without it your carrier will go nowhere

The instrument training teaches you how to fly in IMC (Instrument Meteorological Condition) in other word without outside visual clue and only by reference to instruments. Like inside the cloud, and limited visibility. You will develop the judgment to evaluate adverse weather conditions and the ability to maneuver the helicopter by referring just to instruments. In addition to increasing your capabilities as a helicopter pilot, it also enhances your confidence and increase your safety.

The limitation of an instrument rating:

-       The aircraft must be equipped and IFR certified to flight in actual IMC

-       Must maintain currency by complying with SFAR 61.57 sub (c)

How to get a instrument rating and what do you need?
- Hold at least a current private pilot certificate with an aircraft category and class rating that applies to the instrument rating sought.
- Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language.
- Have received and logged ground training on the aeronautical knowledge areas of this section that apply to the instrument rating sought.
- Have logged at least 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, of which at least 10 - hours must be in helicopters for an instrument-helicopter rating.
- Have a total of 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time on the areas of operation of this section, including at least 15 hours of instrument flight training from an authorized instructor in the aircraft category for which the instrument rating is sought, and instrument training on cross-country flight procedures specific to helicopters that consist of:
- Cross country of at least 100 miles along airways or ATC directed routing
- An instrument approach at each airport and
- Three different kinds of approaches with the use of a navigation system.
- Pass the written test.
Pass an oral and flight test given by the FAA or an approved designated pilot examiner.

The Airline Transport Pilot!

D) Helicopter Airline transport Pilot : Course part 61 available

The Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL), or in the United States of America, an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate (ATP) is the highest level of aircraft pilot rating -- or license.

The privilege of an ATP:

-  Those certified as Airline Transport Pilots are authorized to act as Pilot-In-Command of a scheduled or unscheduled air carrier's aircraft having a maximum gross weight over 12,500 pounds or having over 9 passenger seats.

- A person who holds an airline transport pilot certificate is entitled to the same privileges as a person who holds a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating.]
-  An airline transport pilot may instruct--
        (1) Other pilots in air transportation service in aircraft of the category, class, and type, as     applicable, for which the airline transport pilot is rated and endorse the logbook or other            training record of the person to whom training has been given;
        (2) In flight simulators, and flight training devices representing the aircraft referenced in      paragraph (b)(1) of this section, when instructing under the provisions of this section and      endorse the logbook or other training record of the person to whom training has been given;

        [(3) Only as provided in this section, except that an airline transport pilot who also holds a   flight instructor certificate can exercise the instructor privileges under subpart H of this part         for which he or she is rated; and]

    (4) In an aircraft, only if the aircraft has functioning dual controls, when instructing under     the provisions of this section.
-

 

ATP certificate limitation

 Excluding briefings and debriefings, an airline transport pilot may no instruct in aircraft, flight simulators, and flight training devices under this section--
(1) For more than 8 hours in any 24-consecutive-hour period; or
(2) For more than 36 hours in any 7-consecutive-day period.
- An airline transport pilot may not instruct in Category II or Category III operations unless he or she has been trained and successfully tested under Category II or Category III operations, as applicable.

 

What requirement?

To be eligible for an airline transport pilot certificate, a person must:
- Be at least 23 years of age;
- Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.

- Holds a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating

- Pass a knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas of Sec. 61.155(c) of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought;
- Pass the practical test on the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.157(e) of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought; and
- Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of the applicable FAA requirement that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

 

How to get a ATP certificate and what do you need?

- A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating, must have at least 1,200 hours of total time as a pilot that includes at least:
(1) 500 hours of cross-country flight time;
(2) 100 hours of night flight time, of which 15 hours are in helicopters;
(3) 200 hours of flight time in helicopters, which includes at least 75 hours as a pilot in command, or as second in command performing the duties of a pilot in command under the supervision of a pilot in command, or any combination thereof; and
(4) 75 hours of instrument flight time in actual or simulated instrument meteorological conditions, of which at least 50 hours are obtained in flight with at least 25 hours in helicopters as a pilot in command, or as second in command performing the duties of a pilot in command under the supervision of a pilot in command, or any combination thereof.

-  Training in a flight simulator or flight training device may be credited toward the instrument flight time requirements of paragraph (a)(4) of this section, subject to the following:
(1) Training in a flight simulator or a flight training device must be accomplished in a flight simulator or flight training device that represents a rotorcraft.
(2) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(3) of this section, an applicant may receive credit for not more than a total of 25 hours of simulated instrument time in a flight simulator and flight training device.
(3) A maximum of 50 hours of training in a flight simulator or flight training device may be credited toward the instrument flight time requirements of paragraph (a)(4) of this section if the aeronautical experience is accomplished in an approved course conducted by a training center certificated under part 142 of this chapter.


 
S76 C++ flight deck Helicopter S76 C++ flight deck
Helicopter Instrument Panel Helicopter Instrument Panel